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Repetoire for Beginners

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  • #85781
    jean-mac
    Participant

    I have read many postings about music for the beginner, but still questioning how one knows you have a good teacher.

    #85782
    Chris Asmann
    Participant

    Hi Jean.

    In your situation I would find a few recordings or sheet music that interest me and bring them to a lesson. If you’re not working on music you enjoy, you won’t be as motivated to practice, and more practice = more progress. I don’t think following a set method is really advantageous for an adult beginner, though I’m not a teacher.

    My teacher has altered music to make it more or less advanced to better suit my ability or to round out a beginner piece with nice rolled chords. I’m sure your teacher could do that too, if you choose something that’s just a little too advanced (as opposed to something a lot too advanced). After the first few weeks we’ve gone from a beginner book to short complete pieces of music, just one or two pages that average 30-40 measures. Each one has

    #85783
    dawn-penland
    Participant

    I played a little when I was 13 and took it up again at 52.

    #85784
    jean-mac
    Participant

    The album that was mentioned–is it original works or adaptations?

    #85785
    barbara-brundage
    Participant

    Those are far from beginner pieces, Jean. If you are still on Fun from the First, you would be hugely frustrated. Have you discussed this with your teacher? Do you trust your teacher’s judgment? Can you discuss things with your teacher?

    #85786
    barbara-brundage
    Participant

    >Those are far from beginner pieces, Jean

    I meant the Annie Louise David books, just to clarify.

    #85787
    barbara-brundage
    Participant

    >had to back off from those financially, plus my practicing

    If you want to progress, you *have* to practice. Sorry, but that’s just the way it is. And if you’re at Fun from the First level, you DO need a good teacher if you want to develop classical technique. I realize it’s very hard, and I have a lot of adult students whose lives get in the way of the things they like doing, such as playing the harp, but in those situations you just have to cut yourself some slack and accept that it’s going to take longer, a lot longer, than if you could practice regularly every day and had someone to help you along when you start new music.

    #85788
    barbara-brundage
    Participant

    At your level, I would suggest the Betty Paret pieces “Moonlight”, “I Hear a Harp” and “Berceuse de Noel” but you should have a lesson when you start any of them to be sure you understand how the fingering should be and what some of the symbols mean.

    #85789
    dawn-penland
    Participant

    The album I mentioned is difficult but I didn’t feel Music Box was hard.

    #85790
    barbara-brundage
    Participant

    >with some introduction to harp earlier in life

    That’s the difference, Dawn. And you’re a professional musician on other instruments, too, so you don’t have the note reading challenge to conquer. Most real beginners with no music background would swoon with dismay at all the notes in the Poenitz, you know. 🙂

    #85791
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    My adult students like “First-Grade Pieces for the Harp” by Grandjany/Weidensaul, which starts off very easy but has some nice, original, classical music (and a neat spanish piece at the very end of the book); they also like “Progressive Solos for the Harp” by Jeannie Chenette which has original music focusing on various techniques and fingerings. Both of these require you to be tuned with flats, but you are rewarded at the end of Chenette’s book with a fun piece using the pentatonic scale.

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