Con raghezza?

  • Participant
    unknown-user on #148622

    Hi everyone,

    Does anyone know what “con raghezza” means? I tried looking it up in my music dictionary and then in an italian-english dictionary, but nothing turned up. 🙁

    ~Sam

    Participant
    barbara-brundage on #148623

    Are you sure it’s not a typo for “con larghezza”?

    Participant
    Saul Davis Zlatkovski on #148624

    Or con ragazzo ( with a begging tone?). What piece is it, what is the musical context?

    Participant
    Saul Davis Zlatkovski on #148625

    If the root is raggiare, it would mean “with radiance.”

    That’s why I collected some old music dictionaries, because the recent ones are too limited, but I found that in an Italian dictionary, right after ragazzo.

    Participant
    Tacye on #148626

    Is the text clear enough that you are sure it isn’t vaghezza?

    Participant
    unknown-user on #148627

    It is very clearly “raghezza.” I suppose it could be a typo. :/

    It’s in Grandjany’s Rhapsodie, page 7 line three; the part that has the melody in right hand harmonics and arpeggios in the left hand.

    Sam

    Keymaster
    HBrock25 on #148628

    Hi, I’m Italian and I think there’s a print error as “raghezza” doesn’t exist, “ragazzo” means boy and “raggiare” doesn’t exist but correct translation is “irradiare”, as I don’t have this sheet music (I’m a beginner with harp) I think you should ignore this word and play as you feel the music. I hope I’ve helped you (sorry if

    Member
    nicky t. on #148629

    p.s. I just add that I’ve found

    Participant
    barbara-brundage on #148630

    Oh, I’d forgotten about that. Yes, I believe it’s from the lines in Purgatorio about

    “e se natura produsse mai raghezza di co-
    lori nelle varie parti del mondo, trovasi in quel luogo raccolto”

    so I guess you would interpret it as “spiritually shining” or something like that for that passage.

    Participant
    Saul Davis Zlatkovski on #148631

    Score another one for old dictionaries. So the piece refers to the Inferno as well as a hymn?

    Member
    nicky t. on #148632

    Mmh, this is interesting but Dante wrote in an language which is not italian

    Member
    nicky t. on #148633

    For Saul David Zlatkovsky – I suggest you do not use old dictionary as italian words roots are in latin and ancient greek not in old italian words, also google translator would be better. Hope this information is useful.

    Participant
    barbara-brundage on #148634

    No, it can’t be ‘con vaghezza’, not there.

    Participant
    barbara-brundage on #148635

    Oops, hit Post accidentally. It’s just that ‘con vaghezza’ makes no sense in that spot, and certainly Mr. Grandjany had no vaghezza at all there when he played it, so whatever it is, it’s almost certainly not that.

    Participant
    unknown-user on #148636

    I agree with you, Barbara. “larghezza” doesn’t really make sense either… the passage is not played slow and there’s already a separate tempo indication. I wonder what he meant…

    ~Sam

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • The forum ‘Professional Harpists’ is closed to new topics and replies.