Mozart: Flute & Harp Concerto Critical Edition

Posted In: Repertoire

  • Participant
    MusikFind1 on #230079

    A Critical Edition from the original MS.
    https://www.breitkopf.com/work/9278
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791)
    Concerto in C major K. 299 (297c)
    Urtext edited by András Adorján [fl,hp,orch]
    duration: 27′
    solos: fl. hp – 0.2.0.1(opt). – 2.0.0.0. – str
    In Cooperation with G. Henle Verlag
    Full score, Study score, Piano reduction, Parts for sale.
    Pub: Breitkopf ©2019

    Study score scan: https://issuu.com/breitkopf/docs/pb_15135-07_issuu?fr=xKAE9_zU1NUoqQ0BAQG5aIS_-awY7LPTBzwIDCsHcBPAKwf5CBJ8JZlAbOgzbGG7-ajs6UAE

    Mozart excitedly reported to his father that the Comte de Guines played the flute incomparably, while his daughter was magnifique at the harp. He apparently had no reservations about writing a double concerto for this unusual scoring in Paris in 1778 and even though he had just admitted to his father that he couldn’t stand the flute. It is surprising, then, that Mozart produced a singular, fairly easily performable work. Could it be that he exaggerated their technical abilities for some reason or other when he described his patrons to his father?
    The source situation is clear: An autograph has survived which is definitive in every respect, and can be incontestably included in a modern Urtext edition, down to the distinction between staccato dots and dashes.
    Cadenzas in the piano reduction by Robert D. Levin

    Participant
    Saul Davis Zlatkovski on #230322

    Are there any differences? I’m not particularly impressed. While it has the appoggiaturas written as such, it does not make it clear how to play them correctly, which is a shame. I’ll stick with the Salzedo edition. What we need is to publish Salzedo’s orchestration to go with it.

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