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L&H Chicago Petite 40!

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Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #75497
    I Love Harps
    Participant

    Hello!

    I am a fourteen year old girl, and have played the piano since I was very little. This past spring, I purchased a lever harp and began lessons. It has been PURE BLISS!!

    #75498
    dawn-penland
    Participant

    My friend loves hers.

    #75499
    I Love Harps
    Participant

    ok thank you very much! =D

    #75500

    The Chicago harps I saw and played at the factory were all good. But if you want a harp to keep, get one that has 47 strings and an extended sounding board, which one of the Chicago models has. You will outgrow a 40-string harp quickly, musically speaking, and the way the economy is, don’t assume your parents will be able to buy you more than one harp. Get the best one you can if you are going to stick with it. If it’s possible, get a 23, or a Salzedo. If not, then a 30 or 100. If those are too much, then an 85 or Chicago.

    #75501
    Sid Humphreys
    Spectator

    I totally agree with Saul, I outgrew my Daphne 40 in two years. Go for 47 strings! Since you are looking at L&H you can finance through them as I did. Also think about where you want to go with the harp as you choose your model, solo, chamber, or orchestra? Sauls sugestions are sound and would work well in said venues. Just thought I’s add that!

    #75502
    david-crookston
    Participant

    Hi Emily. I agree with the other comments regarding getting the most strings

    #75503

    I agree, if you are 14 with all those harp years ahead of you, I’d definitely go larger.

    #75504
    I Love Harps
    Participant

    Thank you very much for your suggestions. I understand that it would be best to get a bigger, extended harp, but unfortunataly we’re not able to purchase anything more than $10,000 right now.

    #75505
    I Love Harps
    Participant

    I will

    #75506
    catherine-rogers
    Participant

    Since you have a definite budget, talk to your teacher about finding a good, used harp. You can get more for your money as long as you’re careful to buy a harp in good condition that has been examined by a reputable harp technician so you will know it doesn’t need any major, costly repairs. Check the CPO list on the Lyon & Healy website and the used harps on this website, too. When deciding on size of harp, consider your height now, the fact that you may grow taller, and your possible potential height based on your family. A good semi-grand should last you a lifetime, but it’s hard to practice or play on something that’s way too big for you if you’re petite (I speak from personal experience!). Remember that once you buy a harp, you’re not stuck with it the rest of your life if things change. You can re-sell it and work toward another that’s right for you, even if it takes a while to get there. Lots of harpists do.

    #75507
    Sid Humphreys
    Spectator

    Okay, here’s what I did. I puchased my 40 string harp from Lyon and Healy. I took very good care of it and paid it off a little early. I then, as you would a car, took it back to Lyon and Healy to upgrade. I think they gave me almost

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