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learning Piano after harp?

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 47 total)
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  • #104448
    deb-l
    Participant

    no, not thinking of giving up harp, but am thinking those black keys for sharps and flats are looking mighty attractive and the price is so much less than a pedal harp.

    #104449
    wil-weten
    Participant

    Have you though of trying a cross strung (chromatic harp)?

    All the black keys directly under your fingers…

    Also much cheaper than a pedal harp…

    #104450
    wil-weten
    Participant

    I meant of course ‘thought of’ instead of ‘though of’

    #104451
    deb-l
    Participant

    they seem very difficult to play to me from appearances, but worth looking into more.

    #104452
    wil-weten
    Participant

    Yes, e.g. from Blevins Harps: Xenith 34/24 or Xena 36/25.

    There are several other builders of fine cross strung harps.

    Lots of people start with a small cross strung of three octaves, e.g. Stoney End’s Esabelle, which can be made from a kit (or bought ready made).

    #104453
    Jessica A
    Participant

    You’re getting sidetracked.

    #104454
    unknown-user
    Participant

    I began learning piano after harp. After 7 months of lessons spread over three summers, I am playing some of the Chopin Etudes. I suspect it harder to go from piano to harp than harp to piano – I had no dificulties whatsoever.

    ~Sam

    #104455
    deb-l
    Participant

    Will, that stoney end kit looks like a great deal, and it would be fun to work on a kit with my husband.

    #104456
    Jessica A
    Participant

    You might look into renting from Lyon Healy or getting a used, re-conditioned one from them.

    #104457
    deb-l
    Participant

    thanks Jessica, I do look at their CPO pedal harps often.

    #104458
    Karen Johns
    Participant

    What about portability? Didn’t you mention before that you wanted a lever harp because of the lowered weight factor?

    I have a nice portable Yamaha keyboard with a stand. Not that expensive either. This might be a good option for you.

    I understand your frustration, Deb. Lever-flipping can be very challenging. Lots of patience and especially perserverance is needed, but trust me, you will get the hang of it. BTW, how is ‘Moonlight Sonata’ coming along? Isn’t that the song arranged by Barbara Brundage you were working on?

    Karen

    #104459
    deb-l
    Participant

    hi Karen,

    I needed portability at the beginning because I was moving my harp daily down stairs to play.

    #104460
    sherry-lenox
    Participant

    I was always a lamentable pianist, so much so that because of my fear of piano I actually stopped being a public school music teacher.

    Since playing the harp, I’ve developed much more of a sense of placing and anticipating the appropriate motion between fingerings.

    I absolutely agree that going from piano to harp is harder than going from harp to piano.

    #104461
    deb-l
    Participant

    Sherry, I think the harp is more rewarding to learn how to play accompaniment patterns and timing with two hands because of it’s beautiful tone and the way it resonates.

    #104462
    jessica-wolff
    Participant

    Well, I don’t mind flipping levers and I never liked the piano. The usual argument in favor of the piano, that you can learn theory from it best–well, I can see the structure of a chord better from the harp than from that sea of white that is the piano.

    But I’m leaving out one important aspect: the tactile. All three instruments I play (guitar, harp, banjo) involve directly touching the strings. It’s a more intimate way of playing. (I do like the harpsichord, which is plucked strings rather than struck strings like the piano, but I don’t want to play it.)

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