John Egan Harp 1807 … its broken and I know nothing about the harp,… help!

  • Participant
    unknown-user on #69006

    I just bought a broken harp that says John Egan 1807 ,.. dublin on it, cant make out the rest. It looks like it was thrown down a flight of stairs,.. can it be fixed? How much would that cost? I’m on disability and have very little money, but I would probably attempt to fix it rather than use it as an object of art. Im in San Francisco by the way. here are pics https://picasaweb.google.com/Patrick.Edward.Ward/JohnEganPedalHarp1807?authuser=0&feat=directlink

    Participant
    Saul Davis Zlatkovski on #69007

    I don’t know how you can attempt to fix it without any knowledge of harps. You might do more damage. You can fix it to differing degrees of usability. But even to cosmetically fix it would probably run over $1,000. At least you must have gotten it cheaply, so you can make something by selling it to someone who can repair or rebuild it. But I am curious about its history, when and how did it get to San Francisco, and what stories it could tell… It must have gone around Cape Horn to get there.

    Participant
    Susan Abken on #69008

    Hello, Patrick!

    It costs far more than a thousand dollars to restore a harp like this one to performance condition, if it can be done at all. Harps have hundreds of little pieces that have to be in prime condition and move, or stay put, perfectly. The soundboard has to be in good shape, or replaced. If the column is too warped, a new one may have to be cut, or one removed from an existing harp carcass and transplanted. The tuning pins have to move on command and not at other times. The pedals must connect to the rods, move correctly, and all parts must be in good condition, the pedals re-felted. Obtain opinions from Erich Rase in Michigan and Howard Bryan in Virginia, both of whom are excellent at restoring old harps. Their workshops take their time with attention to detail and quality.

    Erich, who used to work in the Salvi factory in Italy, may be contacted through Atlanta Harp Center, and Howard’s company is H. Bryan and Company, Old Harps Made New. Both gentlemen know what they are doing.

    Best wishes,

    Susan Abken

    Participant
    Saul Davis Zlatkovski on #69009

    As do Pat Dougal and Carl Swanson.

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