Harp bench wobbly

  • Participant
    elizabeth-webb on #76966

    I have a wooden harp bench that I bought from a harp store a while back (the kind that you can adjust the height with knobs on the sides, with the padded seat), but it seems to always be wobbly and sometimes squeaky. I always have to tighten the washer before I sit down to play, even if I have not moved it since the last time I played. Sometimes I have to turn the washer as much as a quarter turn around the screw to get it tight again. All 4 legs do it, some worse than others. Other harpists have mentioned their bench does the same thing. Anyone know of a solution?

    Member
    jimmy-h on #76967

    I’ve heard of some bolts being cheap and they actually stretch with stress, if that was the case you could replace them. It might be worth it to take the wingnut off, remove the leg, and check the bolt that is in the leg to make sure it’s not loose. If it is, try and tighten it before putting it back on.

    If I had to guess without seeing it myself, I’d guess the bolt the wingnut attaches to is not firmly placed in the leg and is working itself loose. Everytime you tighten the wingnut the bolt unscrews a bit from the leg over time. It could be other things, but it’s a good place to start.

    Participant
    ellen-beckerman on #76968

    Does anybody besides me use a drum throne to sit on? I got one years ago for playing the Celtic harp, and find it works great for the pedal harp. I especially like the “Pork Pie Big Boy” drum throne, with the tractor seat. Very stable, ergonomic for good posture, and the seat is wide enough to support the movement of your hips when you change pedals. Mine is purple. spectacular.

    Participant
    Gretchen Cover on #76969

    Put a washer behind the wingnut. It will keep it from loosening.

    Member
    jimmy-h on #76970

    Yeah a washer is a good idea. I’m a dummy.

    I have a throne on order. They seem more utilitarian than a bench, but not as traditional. I’m using a keyboard bench right now and my lower back starts to hurt after a while. I’m also more comfortable with stools that you spin to raise or lower.

    Member
    patricia-jaeger on #76971

    In the past, some benches with four removable legs had screw bolts that went into a hole that had no metal lining to receive the bolt; simply a hole in the wood with no screw thread. This kind of construction meant that over time the screw worked loose. Check whether your connection is metal into metal, more long lasting.

    Member
    kay-lister on #76972

    Elizabeth,

    I have the same bench with the same problem. I don’t mind it so much at home, but I have to take my other bench (round piano stool) with me for gigs, because of the noise that you mentioned. So I too am looking for suggestions.

    Kay

    Member
    jimmy-h on #76973

    Is it possible its not the legs but instead the lifting mechanism? Moving parts are the most likely to come loose or break with many things. Maybe you need to tighten something else.

    Participant
    emma-graham on #76974

    My Dad used to use something call Nutlock to stop screws from coming undone by themselves. It comes in a tube like toothpaste but smaller. Not sure if its available worldwide, I’m in the UK.

    Member
    jimmy-h on #76975

    We have Loctite in the states. I wouldn’t recommend it unless it’s for SURE the source of the problem as you’ll probably never get it off. If the bolt was to be loose in the leg instead of where the wingnut was screwed on, it would prevent further tightening.

    Participant
    Tacye on #76976

    If the bolt is not pulling out, nor the nut unscrewing (mark its position with pen so you can see) then the metal bracket could be bending.

    The legs look removable – if you are sure you will never want this you could glue them in place.

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