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Guitar Chords Chart

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  • #104953
    unknown-user
    Participant

    A few principles can be applied to improving any area of your life which include practice,dedication and commitment.These are particularly helpful in trying to become a better guitarist. If you are not committed to
    practicing everything – from running through the guitar chords chart to
    mastering guitar tabs – you will not make the improvements you desire.We might have to sacrifice other activities in order to develop
    your playing abilities. Real improvement comes with continuity in your playing.

    #104954
    tony-morosco
    Member

    Um… You do realize that this is a harp forum and that guitar chords and guitar tab are pretty much useless to harpists? The concepts don’t translate at all. Harpists can make good use of keyboard chord books, but not guitar. The matrix like interface of guitar is not very applicable to harp.

    #104955
    barbara-low
    Participant

    Kind of funny that the above got posted here, but it brings up some interesting topics.

    Chords are chords, so any musician who knows how to translate them to their instrument would be able to use them.

    Regarding tabs,my former harp teacher used an arrangement of Faure’s Pelleas and Melisande for guitar and flute written in guitar tablature when performing with her flutist. She read it right off the page, but played it an octave lower than written. It was a version they both preferred.

    I can comp chords, but wouldn’t want to read off of tablature. That new stuff without a staff and notes — forget it. I’d have to write it out.

    #104956
    tony-morosco
    Member

    Chords are chords, but guitar chords are written out on a matrix in a way that shows you how and where to place your fingers on the fretboard. Chord tab would be harder to translate than regular tab. It uses barres for guitar many chords are movable. There is no equivalent on the harp since they are to show you how to form your fingers on the guitar to play the chords and the guitar works in a completely different fashion

    As for playing harp off guitar tab, if your teacher could play a melody by sight on harp off of guitar tab then she is a savant of some kind. Of course she also must have been familiar with the piece since guitar tab does not give any rhythm information. All it shows you is what strings to sound and at what fret to press the string on the guitar.

    That is why many guitarists don’t even use them. If you don’t already know

    #104957
    barbara-low
    Participant

    Guitar music is published with the tablature written with the grid you’re referring to below the notes written above it on a staff in treble clef. The notes sound an octave lower than written.

    If guitar music is published in the above form, harpists have another resource to turn to besides piano music.

    No, not a savant; she seems pretty normal to me. Awfully smart though, and resourceful. You’d like her.

    I can play both too, but haven’t touched a guitar in a while. I still recognize chords though, and can comp them during a play-along. Parlor tricks add to the enjoyment of all. It’s fun to be able to join in.

    #104958
    tony-morosco
    Member

    I think we are misunderstanding each other then.

    If you teacher was using music written on a regular staff with the tab under it, and improvising then the guitar tab is irrelevant. She was playing the same way one would play from a lead sheet.

    Tab refers to the grid. That it is often published with the regular notation as well is great, but it isn’t always. I have quite a collection of tab gathered from various sources that have no standard notation included.

    The original poster referred to a guitar chord chart, which is specifically the grid used to display the various ways to form a particular chord in its various forms (as a guitar player yourself you certainly know that most chords have numerous voicing with different fingerings that can be chosen from based on either the arrangers or the players preference).

    I don’t mean to be argumentative so forgive me if I seem that way. I just want to clarify what I am referring to and why I stated that the original posters suggestion that we practice from guitar chord charts is useless to us.

    #104959

    Well, the whole original message seems kind of spammy to me.

    #104960
    tony-morosco
    Member

    I agree, the only thing that doesn’t seem spam like about it is that there was no link to another site or attempt to sell anything.

    #104961
    barbara-low
    Participant

    Yes, there was a misunderstanding. Let’s be friends.

    Though the post was for the guitar, if you substitute harp for guitar and, let’s say for example, pedaling or levering for chord changes and glissandos, then it’s good advice.

    #104962
    tony-morosco
    Member

    LOL.. Agreed on all counts. I actually do use a book of piano chords I practice on the harp, and not long ago got Sylvia Woods Chord and Scale reference chart for harp that I keep in my book of lead sheets so if I come across a chord symbol and I have trouble figuring it out I can easily look it up.

    For guitar I actually have a neat program on my pda that lets me put in any chord and it gives me at least three different fingerings for it.

    #104963
    barbara-low
    Participant

    Ohhh, that pda program sounds like a nice tool to have.

    My teenaged son is showing an interest in guitar. Not the harp, unfortunately, and it could be just a passing interest, but at least he’s doing something in music.

    #104964
    Stephen Conor
    Participant

    I agree with Barbara here. The first instrument that I learned playing is the guitar. Then after some time, I learned piano and harp. And I find it true that any musician can translate chords to different instrument and would be able to use them. I play guitar chords when I have a hard time transcribing piano and harp pieces.

    #104965
    jessica-wolff
    Participant

    Can’t think why you would WANT to use guitar chord charts. (Yes, I play guitar too.) For starters, so many guitar chords are inversions.

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