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fly-away pedal

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • #69893
    Sylvia
    Participant

    Any home remedies?

    #69894
    Tacye
    Participant

    I don’t quite see how a loose pedal can fly away, but gloop (beeswax maybe) in the pivot might form a temporary amelioration.

    #69895
    Sylvia
    Participant

    I guess fly-away is a term from the ancient past.

    #69896
    carl-swanson
    Participant

    The best solution is to have a technician drill out the bronze rivet and replace it with a nut and bolt made specifically for that. It takes time, the pedals have to be removed from the harp to do the work(the brass pedal AND the steel pedal bar inside the base), but it’s not difficult to do. I’m not sure a technician on the road can do it though. You really need a drill press and an anvil to work on it. Where are you located?

    #69897
    Sylvia
    Participant

    I’m in South Texas.

    #69898
    Sylvia
    Participant

    Anyway, thank you for the info.

    #69899
    carl-swanson
    Participant

    Sylvia- If you can get the harp up to Dallas David Williams could take care of it. A temporary fix is to take the pedestal off, disconnect the pedal spring so the pedal and steel pedal bar will stay away from the body of the harp. Take two heavy hammers, hold one against the bronze rivet on one side of the pedal, and then give the other end of the rivet three or four hard whacks with the other hammer. That should tighten up the rivet. But it’s usually just a temporary fix.

    #69900
    Sylvia
    Participant

    Thank you, but Dallas is a really fur piece up the road…lots of gas and time and money, so I’ll just go with inertia.

    #69901

    http://www.permatex.com/products/automotive/thread_compounds/a_threadlockers/auto_Permatex_Penetrating_Grade_Threadlocker_GREEN.htm

    Threadsealers come in different strengths. Be SURE you use one that is temporary. I find I reapply this about every 18 months. My pedals stay where I want them. Use very very little. If they are too stiff at first, work them up and down to get them moving again.

    Pay attention to the instructions and color. It comes in red and blue strengths too. Read and heed instructions for use.

    #69902
    Sylvia
    Participant

    Sounds good, but my pedals don’t have screws, and I don’t know what kind of bolt goes thru there…so I don’t know if there are threads in

    #69903

    I do this on a L&H 30 built in 1975 and a 23 from 1978. I’d guess your pedals are similar. Don’t use too much. Start with ONE drop. It doesn’t take much.

    #69904
    john-strand
    Participant

    about 8 inches of duct tape wound around the offending joint :-)

    BTW – David Williams does travel around Texas so check with him and see if he has plans to be anywhere near you in the foreseeable future – in the meantime, the duct tape will sure stop it from flapping around –

    #69905
    Sylvia
    Participant

    Which color of threadsealer should I get?

    #69906

    Yes, green is what you need. Try an auto parts store. They should have it in stock.

    ONE drop of the green stuff. If you get too much it’s very stiff for a while.

    Each color indicates how the stuff works. The wrong stuff will be worse than the floppy pedal.

    #69907
    Sylvia
    Participant

    I got the green stuff.

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