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Fastest way to learn the Harp?

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Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #82982
    Nita T
    Participant

    I was wondering if there have ever been any comparative studies to determine the fastest and most effective way to teach the harp?

    #82983
    elinor-niemisto
    Participant

    I think a far bigger variable is the student: there is such a wide range of aptitude, ambition, focus, parental

    #82984
    carl-swanson
    Participant

    Fabulous answer Elinor!

    #82985
    tony-morosco
    Member

    I second Carl.

    Differnt things will work better for different people, but in the end how fast a person learns isn’t what is important. It is how motivated the student is that matters most. The fastest learner still isn’t going to get far if he or she isn’t motivated to learn in the first place.

    #82986

    All I can say is that my way is the fastest and best way that I can teach, because of the results I have gotten, but that is because it is me I am talking about. But, seriously, I have gotten very fast results.

    #82987
    kay-lister
    Member

    Get an excellent teacher and work hard.

    Kay

    #82988
    janelle-lake
    Participant

    Yes!

    #82989
    jessica-wolff
    Participant

    What’s the hurry, anyhow?

    #82990
    sharon-crabbe
    Participant

    Learning anything new is comparable to a journey in life.

    #82991
    kreig-kitts
    Member

    This question reminds me of the following brief

    #82992
    adam-b-harris
    Participant

    Reminded me a bit of those Expert Village videos on YouTube Kreig.

    #82993
    niina
    Participant

    I agree with Elinor. A student can be ‘gifted’ but not practise hard, so all the teaching in the world isn’t going to change that.

    From my own personal experience, it was motivation both from my teacher and from me. I saw Peter Moore on the BBC Young Musician of the Year in 2008 and decided then and there that I wanted to go to Chethams School of Music. I had just started the piano, but always dreamed of playing Harp. I persuaded my parents to let me learn, and started mid 2008. I managed to get a great teacher who pushed me forward in a very enjoyable way, and asked a lot of me each week, which I gave. I managed to get through a year’s study each month. I got into Chets in Sept 2009. If it wasn’t for the constant belief that Alice Trentham had in me and her pushing me forward, I probably wouldn’t have made it.

    Although I may pick things up quickly, I am in no doubt that the quality of my playing is no where near that of a Harpist of my age who has worked hard over many more years than I have. I have uploaded many videos on Youtube from 2 weeks in, till 8 months ago, it was for my relatives in Japan to see my progress, and for me to check my technique and journey.

    And another nod to Elinor, regarding child prodigies; in the end it all equals itself out. A child prodigy is, most of the time only ‘amazing’ while they are young (although there are exceptions). The people who work hard over many years nearly always catch up. Tortoise and the Hare sort of thing. There’s nothing to beat hard work and dedication from both teacher and student, who must love playing the Harp not just fancy playing it.

    #82994
    Jerusha Amado
    Participant

    <<A child prodigy is, most of the time only 'amazing' while they are
    young (although there are exceptions). The people who work hard over
    many years nearly always catch up. Tortoise and the Hare sort of thing.>>

    Hi Lizzie,

    What you’re saying about prodigies brings to mind Thomas Edison’s quote:

    “Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.“

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